New Asset

I'll Let That Slide

Workplace Stereotypes and Biases

In the workplace, we need to be sensitive to how stereotypes can creep into our conversations and influence our actions. We also have a responsibility to speak up when we observe the kinds of statements in this scenario because, while often unintentional, they can easily lead to misunderstandings and reinforced stereotypes. Helping one another is an important part of creating and maintaining a respectful work environment.

Learning Path & Details

Competencies

  • Understanding Diversity
  • Fostering Inclusion, Equity & Belonging

Learning Objectives

  • Understanding the negative impact of bias and stereotypes - on relationships, productivity and more!
  • Learn that impact can outweigh intent. Sometimes we can be offensive without intending to be.

Buying Options

Library License

You may license this asset or the entire video library. Please contact your sales representative for cost-effective license pricing. Enterprise licensing also available.
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Download License $5.00 (Minimum 100 employees)

We will contact you for license agreement details and any applicable set-up fees.
Employees: 

USB Drive $595.00

Secure USB must be seated in computer in order to run. Content can't be copied or downloaded. Purchase price allows access to content for one year. Discounted renewal available. Discussion/workshop materials (when applicable) will be delivered via email.
USB: 

Training Files (5)

TitleTypeTime/PagesLanguage 
NEW I'll Let That Slide
Video with graphics and narrator
Video Vignette02:35 minEnglishDemo
NEW I'll Let That Slide
Discussion Guide
Workshop Material 6 pagesEnglishDemo
NEW I'll Let That Slide
Video Discussion Questions
Workshop Material 2 pagesEnglishDemo
NEW I'll Let That Slide
As Produced Script
Workshop Material 4 pagesEnglishDemo
NEW Self-Reflection: The M.E.E.T.® Model
Participant Materials
Workshop Material 3 pagesEnglishDemo

Additional Information

Whether we like it or not, our culture has conditioned us to stereotypes and assumptions concerning others. Some are very blatant. We all generally recognize them for what they are—unfounded bias. Others are more subtle; some even take the form of cultural generalizations that have become acceptable.


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